Events

Jul
24
Mon
Letters from the Ali‘i: 1820–1887. @ Lyman Museum
Jul 24 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Hemahema ltr with 1830 captionEvening presentation:

In a project organized and headed by the Hawaiian Mission Houses Historic Site and Archives, more than 225 letters written by 42 Ali‘i during the 1800s have been digitized, transcribed, translated, and annotated, and are now preserved in the Mission Houses Archives in Honolulu.  The collection contains many of the earliest examples of the written Hawaiian language and covers a wide range of topics, from details of daily life, to increasing concerns with the role of Ali‘i within the church, to disputes on sovereignty with Britain and France.  On two successive Mondays in July, Dr. Kapali Lyon of UH-Mānoa brings these unique pages of history to light.  His presentation also introduces us to the HMH’s “Letters of the Ali‘i” project, its principal writers, and the role of the letters in helping to understand the connection of the Ali‘i to the Christian mission in Hawai‘i during the first half of the nineteenth century.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers. 

Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge! 

Seating is limited; first come, first seated. 

On Monday evenings onlyadditional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall.

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

Jul
31
Mon
The Great Barrier Reef: Still Great! @ Lyman Museum
Jul 31 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm
Sea hare

Sea hare

Matinée presentation:

Recent news reports have proclaimed that Australia’s Great Barrier Reef is dying as the result of sequential, massive coral bleaching events.  The Great Barrier Reef—one of our planet’s greatest natural treasures and the only living structure visible from outer space—developed over hundreds of thousands of years and is home to one of Earth’s most complex ecosystems.  Surveys of the northernmost sections of the reef reveal an unprecedented die-off in the stony corals that make up the reef, which scientists and the Australian Government say is due to climate change and to rising ocean temperatures in particular.  What’s happening in Australian waters is part of a global trend that includes Hawai‘i’s reefs.  However, there is hope for the future of these natural wonders.  Hawai’i’s own Susan Scott, naturalist and author, has been sailing her boat, Honu, on the Great Barrier Reef for the past three years and has found it to be very much alive.  This afternoon, and again in the evening, Susan shares photos of the extraordinary marine life she encountered in these waters, and discusses both the science and the politics of Australia’s irreplaceable World Heritage Centre.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers. 

Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge! 

Seating is limited; first come, first seated. 

On Monday evenings onlyadditional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall.

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

The Great Barrier Reef: Still Great! @ Lyman Museum
Jul 31 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm
Sea hare

Sea hare

Evening presentation:

Recent news reports have proclaimed that Australia’s Great Barrier Reef is dying as the result of sequential, massive coral bleaching events.  The Great Barrier Reef—one of our planet’s greatest natural treasures and the only living structure visible from outer space—developed over hundreds of thousands of years and is home to one of Earth’s most complex ecosystems.  Surveys of the northernmost sections of the reef reveal an unprecedented die-off in the stony corals that make up the reef, which scientists and the Australian Government say is due to climate change and to rising ocean temperatures in particular.  What’s happening in Australian waters is part of a global trend that includes Hawai‘i’s reefs.  However, there is hope for the future of these natural wonders.  Hawai’i’s own Susan Scott, naturalist and author, has been sailing her boat, Honu, on the Great Barrier Reef for the past three years and has found it to be very much alive.  This afternoon, and again in the evening, Susan shares photos of the extraordinary marine life she encountered in these waters, and discusses both the science and the politics of Australia’s irreplaceable World Heritage Centre.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers. 

Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge! 

Seating is limited; first come, first seated. 

On Monday evenings onlyadditional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall.

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

Aug
14
Mon
What You Need to Know About Rat Lungworm Disease. @ Lyman Museum
Aug 14 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

rat lung wormEvening presentation:

East Hawai‘i has experienced a dramatic increase in serious cases of rat lungworm disease among residents and visitors over the past ten years.  Most infections with the parasite that causes this disease are preventable, but comprehensive prevention efforts have lagged despite the severity of the current outbreak.  On Monday evening, and again on Tuesday afternoon, Dr. Susan Jarvi (UH-Hilo’s College of Pharmacy) describes the biology of the rat lungworm parasite, including life cycle, disease carriers, exposure risk, diagnostic testing, and proven prevention measures.  She also comments on current and potential research on the disease.  Dr. Jon Martell (Hilo Medical Center and Hale Ho‘ola Hamakua) reviews the clinical aspects of rat lungworm disease in humans, sharing information on clinical signs and symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment.  Owing to the timeliness of this topic, we can expect a lively Q&A session to follow!

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers. 

Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge! 

Seating is limited; first come, first seated. 

On Monday evenings onlyadditional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall.

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

Aug
15
Tue
What You Need to Know About Rat Lungworm Disease. @ Lyman Museum
Aug 15 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm

rat lung wormMatinée presentation:

East Hawai‘i has experienced a dramatic increase in serious cases of rat lungworm disease among residents and visitors over the past ten years.  Most infections with the parasite that causes this disease are preventable, but comprehensive prevention efforts have lagged despite the severity of the current outbreak.  On Monday evening, and again on Tuesday afternoon, Dr. Susan Jarvi (UH-Hilo’s College of Pharmacy) describes the biology of the rat lungworm parasite, including life cycle, disease carriers, exposure risk, diagnostic testing, and proven prevention measures.  She also comments on current and potential research on the disease.  Dr. Jon Martell (Hilo Medical Center and Hale Ho‘ola Hamakua) reviews the clinical aspects of rat lungworm disease in humans, sharing information on clinical signs and symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment.  Owing to the timeliness of this topic, we can expect a lively Q&A session to follow!

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers. 

Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge! 

Seating is limited; first come, first seated. 

On Monday evenings onlyadditional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall.

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

Aug
28
Mon
The Plant Extinction Protection Program: Saving Hawai‘i’s Rarest Plants. @ Lyman Museum
Aug 28 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm

Picture4Matinée presentation:

The Hawaiian Islands have a rich and beautiful natural history, but it is under threat.  Many native Hawaiian plants and animals have become extinct and many more are at risk.  Despite large-scale efforts to protect Hawai‘i’s ecosystems, many rare plant populations continue to decline.  Recovering the rarest of the rare species takes very close management.  The Plant Extinction Protection Program focuses on safeguarding and restoring more than 200 species of native plant statewide, those that are most at-risk for extinction with fewer than 50 individuals remaining in the wild.  The Program’s efforts include locating as many new individuals as possible, protecting them from threats, collecting specimens for propagation, and establishing genetically diverse populations in protected areas.  Working closely with land managers from many different agencies as well as private landowners, the Program partners to protect these plants wherever they occur.  This afternoon, and again in the evening, Joshua VanDeMark, Hawai‘i Island PEPP Coordinator, introduces us to this rigorous—and rewarding—work, often undertaken in some of our Island’s most rugged and remote areas.  Learn how these initiatives are working to keep so much of our unique and irreplaceable natural heritage from vanishing.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers. 

Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge! 

Seating is limited; first come, first seated. 

On Monday evenings onlyadditional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall.

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

The Plant Extinction Protection Program: Saving Hawai‘i’s Rarest Plants. @ Lyman Museum
Aug 28 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Picture4Evening presentation:

The Hawaiian Islands have a rich and beautiful natural history, but it is under threat.  Many native Hawaiian plants and animals have become extinct and many more are at risk.  Despite large-scale efforts to protect Hawai‘i’s ecosystems, many rare plant populations continue to decline.  Recovering the rarest of the rare species takes very close management.  The Plant Extinction Protection Program focuses on safeguarding and restoring more than 200 species of native plant statewide, those that are most at-risk for extinction with fewer than 50 individuals remaining in the wild.  The Program’s efforts include locating as many new individuals as possible, protecting them from threats, collecting specimens for propagation, and establishing genetically diverse populations in protected areas.  Working closely with land managers from many different agencies as well as private landowners, the Program partners to protect these plants wherever they occur.  This afternoon, and again in the evening, Joshua VanDeMark, Hawai‘i Island PEPP Coordinator, introduces us to this rigorous—and rewarding—work, often undertaken in some of our Island’s most rugged and remote areas.  Learn how these initiatives are working to keep so much of our unique and irreplaceable natural heritage from vanishing.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers. 

Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge! 

Seating is limited; first come, first seated. 

On Monday evenings onlyadditional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall.

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

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