Events

Sep
1
Sun
September 2019 – Celebrate Museums Month @ Lyman Museum
Sep 1 – Sep 30 all-day

Click on Map for printable flyer, .pdf format.

This September marks the twelfth year Hawai‘i Island museums are collaborating to open their doors to other museums’ members.

“Celebrating Museums Month” is a month-long program to cross-promote these important local institutions.  During the month of September, each will provide free admission to the members of other participating institutions when a current museum membership card is shown.  Some institutions will also be offering discounts on store items or tours to these members.

Museum members will have an opportunity to spend September exploring and discovering the wonders and treasures of museums they may not have yet experienced, or may not have visited in a long time.  Below is a list of participating museums the the benefits they are offering.


 Participants – SEPTEMBER 2019: CELEBRATE MUSEUMS MONTH

“Celebrate Museums Month” is a month-long program to cross-promote these important local institutions.  During the month of September, each institution listed below, will provide the benefits listed below to the members of other participating institutions with a current membership card.   

East Hawai’i Cultural Center/HMOCA – No admission charge, donations welcome. Hours: Tuesday-Saturday  10 A.M. to 4 P.M.  Closed Sunday and Monday. Check website: www.ehcc.org for current exhibitions, workshops, and events. For more information call (808) 961-5711 or email admin@ehcc.org.

Hawai’i Plantation Museum – Free admission to members of any other participating museums. Hours Tues. – Sat. 10am – 3pm. Located at 27-246 Old Mamalahoa Hwy (in former Yoshiyama Store). Visit www.plantationmuseum.org. Books and other retail items available. (808) 964-5151.

Hulihe‘e Palace – Free Admission to members (card needs to be presented), 10-15% discount in store, depends on membership level.  Museum and Gift Shop Hours: Monday-Saturday 9:00 A.M. – 4:00 P.M. & Sundays: 10:00 A.M. – 3:00 P.M. Closed major holidays.  Museum phone (808) 329-1877 & Gift Shop phone (808) 329-6558.  www.daughtersofhawaii.org.

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center – Free (DAYTIME) admission to members of any other participating museums. No store discount. Discounted member fees apply for special evening planetarium shows. Membership ID from participating museum required.  Center hours: Tuesday-Sunday, 9 A.M. to 5 P.M. (808) 932-8901. For shows and events, please check website: www.imiloahawaii.org.  Sky Garden Restaurant at `Imiloa. 10% discount applies. Restaurant hours: Tuesday – Sunday, 7 A.M. to 4 P.M. for breakfast and lunch; Thursday – Sunday, 5pm-8:30pm for dinner. (808) 969-9753.

Kona Historical Society – Free admission.  Kona Coffee Living History Farm: Monday-Friday, 10 A.M. to 2 P.M.  H.N. Greenwell Store Museum: Tuesday & Thursday 10 A.M. to 2 P.M. (808) 323-3222.  www.konahistorical.org.

Laupehoehoe Train Museum – Free admission. Hours: Open 10am – 3pm Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday. Other days by appointment. Book tours in advance by visiting www.thetrainmuseum.com. Call (808) 962-6300.

Lyman Museum and Mission House – Free admission. Hours: Monday-Saturday 10:00 A.M. to 4:30 P.M. 10% discount in Museum Shop.  Mission House tours available.  (808) 935-5021. www.lymanmuseum.org.

NOAA’s Mokupāpapa Discovery Center – No admission charged, monthly evening presentation series, craft night and free group education/outreach lessons, tours and activities available with reservation, link http://goo.gl/Ylbv2s. Also room rentals available for private and public events.  Hour: Tues – Sat. 9am – 4pm. Phone: (808) 933-8184. For education booking call (808) 933-8195; email:  pmnm.mokupapapa@gmail.com or visit papahanaumokuakea.gov.

Pacific Tsunami Museum – Free admission.  Hours: Tuesday-Saturday, 10 A.M. to 4 P.M.  For more info call (808) 935-0926 or visit www.tsunami.org.

The Pana‘ewa Rainforest Zoo & Gardens – No admission charge, but museum members from participating museums will receive a special gift at the Zoo Gift Shop!  Hours: Daily, 9 A.M. to 4 P.M.  (808) 959-9233.  www.hilozoo.com.

Volcano Art Center – The Volcano Art Center operates two locations. The Gallery location in Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park, open daily,  9am -5pm, showcases the fine art of approx. 200 local artists.  Park entrance fees apply. (808) 967-7565.   The Niaulani Campus in Volcano Village features guided forest tours, an outdoor sculpture garden, gallery, and ongoing classes and workshops, open 9am-5pm, Mon. – Fri. (808) 967-8222.   Participating museum members receive a free poster at either location.   www.volcanoartcenter.org.

Wailoa Center – Located in the Wailoa park next to the Tsunami Memorial, Vietnam Memorial, and across the river from the King Kamehameha Statue. Admission is free and open to the public Monday through Friday 8:30 A.M. – 4:30 P.M. Closed Saturdays, Sundays and State Holidays. Monthly exhibits by local artists include a variety of fine art, contemporary craft, woodworking, multi-cultural exhibits, quilts, photography and more.  For additional information please call Codie M. King (808) 933-0416 or email: wailoa@yahoo.com or visit www.wailoacenter.com.

Sep
30
Mon
Roadside Geology of the Island of Hawai‘i: Three Interesting Explorations @ Lyman Musem
Sep 30 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Evening Presentation:

Spectacular as they were (and are), there is so much more to the geology of our Islands than the volcanic eruptions which have created them.  This presentation unearths three fascinating, little-discussed geological situations on Hawai‘i Island:  what they are, what they tell us, and how you yourself can explore them!  The line-up includes Waipi‘o Valley and the Kohala Coast … the northward movement of the Wailuku River channel in Hilo … and the “migrating” east rift zone of Kīlauea.  Each vignette is illuminated with cartoon drawings, photos, and interpretations that will help you observe Hawaiian landscapes with renewed appreciation for what geologists are learning about them.  Join UH-Hilo geology faculty Dr. Richard Hazlett, Dr. Cheryl Gansecki, and Dr. Steven Lundblad—co-authors of a forthcoming revision of the now-classic Roadside Geology of Hawai‘i—on your choice of two occasions:  Monday evening, September 30, or the following afternoon, October 1.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers.  Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge!  Seating is limited; first come, first seated.  ON MONDAY EVENINGS ONLY, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

Oct
1
Tue
Roadside Geology of the Island of Hawai‘i: Three Interesting Explorations @ Lyman Musem
Oct 1 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm

Matinée Presentation:

Spectacular as they were (and are), there is so much more to the geology of our Islands than the volcanic eruptions which have created them.  This presentation unearths three fascinating, little-discussed geological situations on Hawai‘i Island:  what they are, what they tell us, and how you yourself can explore them!  The line-up includes Waipi‘o Valley and the Kohala Coast … the northward movement of the Wailuku River channel in Hilo … and the “migrating” east rift zone of Kīlauea.  Each vignette is illuminated with cartoon drawings, photos, and interpretations that will help you observe Hawaiian landscapes with renewed appreciation for what geologists are learning about them.  Join UH-Hilo geology faculty Dr. Richard Hazlett, Dr. Cheryl Gansecki, and Dr. Steven Lundblad—co-authors of a forthcoming revision of the now-classic Roadside Geology of Hawai‘i—on your choice of two occasions:  Monday evening, September 30, or the following afternoon, October 1.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers.  Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge!  Seating is limited; first come, first seated.  ON MONDAY EVENINGS ONLY, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

Oct
7
Mon
Humpback Whale Mysteries and the Science Being Used to Solve Them @ Lyman Musem
Oct 7 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm

Matinée Presentation:

In January 2016 many of Hawai‘i’s ocean users began to notice something strange:  noticeably fewer humpback whales than in previous years during the same time period.  This marked the start of an unusual period in the annual occurrence of whales in Hawaiian waters.  Dr. Marc Lammers, of the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary, shares some of the science that has been conducted to better understand the observed trends, as well as the underlying causes.  In addition, another humpback whale mystery—the function of the iconic song produced by males—is explored in our showing of the recent PBS documentary, “Changing Seas: Mystery of the Humpback Whale Song.”  This documentary features the research of both Dr. Lammers and UH-Hilo’s Dr. Adam Pack, as they dive into the world of the humpback whale to uncover the reason why males sing.  This episode was filmed on location off Maui very recently (in February 2019) … and a Q&A session with Drs. Lammers and Pack will follow their presentations, twice on Monday, October 7 (afternoon and evening).

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers.  Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge!  Seating is limited; first come, first seated.  ON MONDAY EVENINGS ONLY, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

Humpback Whale Mysteries and the Science Being Used to Solve Them @ Lyman Musem
Oct 7 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Evening Presentation:

In January 2016 many of Hawai‘i’s ocean users began to notice something strange:  noticeably fewer humpback whales than in previous years during the same time period.  This marked the start of an unusual period in the annual occurrence of whales in Hawaiian waters.  Dr. Marc Lammers, of the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary, shares some of the science that has been conducted to better understand the observed trends, as well as the underlying causes.  In addition, another humpback whale mystery—the function of the iconic song produced by males—is explored in our showing of the recent PBS documentary, “Changing Seas: Mystery of the Humpback Whale Song.”  This documentary features the research of both Dr. Lammers and UH-Hilo’s Dr. Adam Pack, as they dive into the world of the humpback whale to uncover the reason why males sing.  This episode was filmed on location off Maui very recently (in February 2019) … and a Q&A session with Drs. Lammers and Pack will follow their presentations, twice on Monday, October 7 (afternoon and evening).

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers.  Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge!  Seating is limited; first come, first seated.  ON MONDAY EVENINGS ONLY, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

Oct
14
Mon
Uncovering the History of Shinmachi @ Lyman Musem
Oct 14 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Evening Presentation:

Every day in Hilo, locals and visitors gaze at the statue of Kamehameha, picnic in Wailoa State Park, and play soccer on the grass along Kamehameha Avenue.  Only a few may know that between 1913 and 1946, this green space between Hilo Iron Works and Bishop Street was Shinmachi, a thriving neighborhood of pioneering small business owners who beat the odds to establish such Hawai‘i Island mainstays as Hawaii Planing Mill, Atebara Potato Chips (ono!), S. Tokunaga Sports, Hilo Transportation, and Hilo Macaroni Factory (makers of the original Saloon Pilot Cracker).  The Hawaii Consolidated Railway helped maintain many business and family ties between Shinmachi and Hakalau to the north … but the tsunami of April 1, 1946 disrupted these connections when it destroyed the mill at Hakalau Plantation and swept Shinmachi off the map.  Yet the memories, legacies, and spirit of this place live on in the tsunami survivors and Shinmachi descendants who still reside in our community.  Historian Heather Fryer gives us a very special presentation of Shinmachi history, stories, and photographs, highlighting the ways in which plantation values sustained these small business families through the nation’s Great Depression, World War II, and the destructive force of the tsunami, on two occasions:  Monday evening, October 14, and the following afternoon, October 15.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers.  Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge!  Seating is limited; first come, first seated.  ON MONDAY EVENINGS ONLY, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

Oct
15
Tue
Uncovering the History of Shinmachi @ Lyman Musem
Oct 15 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm

Matinée Presentation:

Every day in Hilo, locals and visitors gaze at the statue of Kamehameha, picnic in Wailoa State Park, and play soccer on the grass along Kamehameha Avenue.  Only a few may know that between 1913 and 1946, this green space between Hilo Iron Works and Bishop Street was Shinmachi, a thriving neighborhood of pioneering small business owners who beat the odds to establish such Hawai‘i Island mainstays as Hawaii Planing Mill, Atebara Potato Chips (ono!), S. Tokunaga Sports, Hilo Transportation, and Hilo Macaroni Factory (makers of the original Saloon Pilot Cracker).  The Hawaii Consolidated Railway helped maintain many business and family ties between Shinmachi and Hakalau to the north … but the tsunami of April 1, 1946 disrupted these connections when it destroyed the mill at Hakalau Plantation and swept Shinmachi off the map.  Yet the memories, legacies, and spirit of this place live on in the tsunami survivors and Shinmachi descendants who still reside in our community.  Historian Heather Fryer gives us a very special presentation of Shinmachi history, stories, and photographs, highlighting the ways in which plantation values sustained these small business families through the nation’s Great Depression, World War II, and the destructive force of the tsunami, on two occasions:  Monday evening, October 14, and the following afternoon, October 15.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers.  Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge!  Seating is limited; first come, first seated.  ON MONDAY EVENINGS ONLY, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

Oct
26
Sat
Eleventh Annual Golf Tournament Fundraiser @ Hualālai Golf Course at Ka'upulehu
Oct 26 @ 7:00 am – 3:00 pm

The Lyman Museum and Mission House will be holding its Fred Koehnen Memorial Golf Tournament on Saturday, October 26, 2019 at the Hualālai Golf Course at Ka’upulehu.  This tournament is a two-person scramble limited to 72 players. Registration is at 7:00 am, Shotgun start at 8:00 am, 1:00 pm Lunch, Refreshments and Awards served at the Hualālai Grill. (Please download registration form)

The Lyman Museum was established by the descendants of missionaries David and Sarah Lyman in 1931. The Lyman Museum is home to a superb collection of natural and cultural artifacts, fine art, and natural history exhibits. The archives houses thousands of historical documents, books, maps and photographic collections.

Regardless of age or heritage, the Lyman Museum is here for all who seek to learn about Hawai’i, its islands and its people. Some 2,000 students toured the Museum this past year! 

The Lyman Museum is one of only four Hawai’i museums accredited by the American Association of Museums and is also a Smithsonian Affiliate.  The Lyman Museum holds 501(c)(3) tax exempt status and your donation is tax deductible. This fundraiser will support the Lyman Museum’s efforts to preserve the past and collect the present for the future.

We sincerely appreciate your support.  We want to be sure you and your company are recognized, and we look forward to hearing from you by October 11, 2019. Early Bird registration deadline is September 30, 2019 (Early Bird players will be entered to win extra prizes)

For more information, please feel free to contact Liz Ambrose at (808) 935-5021 extension 106.

To download a golf flyer for the event click here!

Nov
4
Mon
Confronting Change: The Conversion of Ka‘ahumanu @ Lyman Musem
Nov 4 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Evening Presentation:

Caught in a collision of cultures and facing the onslaught of relentless change, Hawaiian and missionary women confronted seminal events in 19th-century Hawai‘i which inextricably altered their lives—and the lives of others—forever.  Acclaimed playwright Victoria Nālani Kneubuhl created the poignant “The Conversion of Ka‘ahumanu” to interweave the stories of five women during one of the most difficult periods in Hawai‘i’s history.  The play has been produced in full and as readings in New York, Washington, D.C., and Edinburgh, Scotland.  Now the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo will mount its own full-scale production of this play in April 2020 … but you can enjoy a VIP preview with this dramatic reading directed by Jackie Pualani Johnson.  The five women include Lucy Thurston (Justina Mattos), Sybil Bingham (Barbara Moir), Ka‘ahumanu (Jackie Pualani Johnson), Hannah Grimes (Megan Mina), and Pali (Tyler Dela Cruz), with Victoria Nālani Kneubuhl reading stage directions. Don’t miss this moving portrayal, presented on two occasions:  Monday evening, November 4, and the following afternoon, November 5.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers.  Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge!  Seating is limited; first come, first seated.  ON MONDAY EVENINGS ONLY, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

Nov
5
Tue
Confronting Change: The Conversion of Ka‘ahumanu @ Lyman Musem
Nov 5 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm

Matinée Presentation:

Caught in a collision of cultures and facing the onslaught of relentless change, Hawaiian and missionary women confronted seminal events in 19th-century Hawai‘i which inextricably altered their lives—and the lives of others—forever.  Acclaimed playwright Victoria Nālani Kneubuhl created the poignant “The Conversion of Ka‘ahumanu” to interweave the stories of five women during one of the most difficult periods in Hawai‘i’s history.  The play has been produced in full and as readings in New York, Washington, D.C., and Edinburgh, Scotland.  Now the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo will mount its own full-scale production of this play in April 2020 … but you can enjoy a VIP preview with this dramatic reading directed by Jackie Pualani Johnson.  The five women include Lucy Thurston (Justina Mattos), Sybil Bingham (Barbara Moir), Ka‘ahumanu (Jackie Pualani Johnson), Hannah Grimes (Megan Mina), and Pali (Tyler Dela Cruz), with Victoria Nālani Kneubuhl reading stage directions. Don’t miss this moving portrayal, presented on two occasions:  Monday evening, November 4, and the following afternoon, November 5.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers.  Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge!  Seating is limited; first come, first seated.  ON MONDAY EVENINGS ONLY, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

Nov
11
Mon
Plastic Pollution: Stories of Recovery, Reduction, and Lessons Learned from Ka‘ū @ Lyman Musem
Nov 11 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Evening Presentation:

A mega-gyre of floating plastic estimated to be larger than Texas is annually carrying massive amounts of marine debris to Hawai‘i’s beaches and reefs.  From Ka Lae (South Point) and other Hawai‘i Island coastal areas, the Hawai‘i Wildlife Fund’s volunteers have removed more than 278 tons of plastic debris since 2003 … but the debris continues to come ashore at an estimated 15-20 tons per year.  HWF’s Megan Lamson discusses this critical threat to our environment, and the vital role played by volunteers in combating it, on two occasions:  Monday evening, November 11, and the following afternoon, November 12.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers.  Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge!  Seating is limited; first come, first seated.  ON MONDAY EVENINGS ONLY, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

Nov
12
Tue
Plastic Pollution: Stories of Recovery, Reduction, and Lessons Learned from Ka‘ū @ Lyman Musem
Nov 12 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm

Matinée Presentation:

A mega-gyre of floating plastic estimated to be larger than Texas is annually carrying massive amounts of marine debris to Hawai‘i’s beaches and reefs.  From Ka Lae (South Point) and other Hawai‘i Island coastal areas, the Hawai‘i Wildlife Fund’s volunteers have removed more than 278 tons of plastic debris since 2003 … but the debris continues to come ashore at an estimated 15-20 tons per year.  HWF’s Megan Lamson discusses this critical threat to our environment, and the vital role played by volunteers in combating it, on two occasions:  Monday evening, November 11, and the following afternoon, November 12.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers.  Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge!  Seating is limited; first come, first seated.  ON MONDAY EVENINGS ONLY, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

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