Events

Mar
25
Mon
It Takes a Hui: Protecting Hawai‘i’s White Terns @ Lyman Museum
Mar 25 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm
Photo by David Dow

Photo by David Dow

Matinée and Evening presentation (ONE DATE ONLY):

In 1961, only a single pair of white terns (formerly called fairy terns) nested in Honolulu.  Over the decades, these lovely seabirds continued to choose urban Honolulu as a place to raise chicks.  Today, at 2,300 and counting, white terns nest throughout the city’s introduced trees, ranging throughout Waikiki, the Civic Center, Mānoa, and beyond. 

Naturalist and author Susan Scott brings us a PowerPoint presentation featuring her latest book—White Tern, Manu-O-Ku, and Urban Seabird (UH Press, 2018)—in which she tells us “how citizen scientists, researchers, government employees, educators, wildlife groups, writers, photographers, tree trimmers, birders, office workers, condo dwellers, and others came together to help Hawaii’s white terns.” 

Twice on March 25 (afternoon and evening), Scott shares the heartwarming story of people gathering together to protect this cherished seabird.  Copies of her book will be available in the Museum Shop, and Scott will be happy to inscribe them.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers.  Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge!  Seating is limited; first come, first seated.  ON MONDAY EVENINGS ONLY, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

Mar
29
Fri
Ni’ihau Shell Workshops with Kumu Kele Kanahele
Mar 29 @ 10:00 am – Mar 30 @ 4:00 pm
kele_workshop

Ni’ihau shell jewelry set in the pikake style. Kumu Kele Kanahele. Photo courtesy of Kumu Kele.

Just in time for Merrie Monarch, Kumu Kele Kanahele of the Island of Ni‘ihau returns to teach the authentic creation of Ni‘ihau shell jewelry!  Visit his acclaimed workshop twice in March:

Friday, March 29                        10:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M.
Saturday, March 30                   10:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M.

On either day you may learn how to make an 22-inch necklace/lei ($370 Museum members, $380 nonmembers) or a pair of earrings ($75 members, $85 nonmembers) in the pikake style, using momi ke`oke`o shells (white) or momi lenalena shells (yellow).  You may, of course, create more than one piece, as long as you sign up for specific pieces in advance

Give someone you love (yourself, perhaps?) this very special gift of the Hawaiian culture!

For more information, please call 935-5021 ext. 101 or stop by the Museum’s Admissions desk.

Space is limited to 24 persons per day; only people who have registered can be permitted in the classroom.  Reservations must be made, pieces and colors specified, and the workshop fee(s) paid by Friday, March 22, to ensure your place and the availability of shells. 

____________________________________________

Lyman Museum   276 Haili St.   Hilo, HI   (808) 935-5021   www.lymanmuseum.org

The nationally accredited and Smithsonian-affiliated Lyman Museum showcases the natural and cultural

history of Hawai‘i to tell the story of its islands and people.

Apr
15
Mon
Return to the Wild, One Year Later: Updating Us on Reintroducing the ‘Alalā to Their Forests! @ Lyman Museum
Apr 15 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm
`Alala. Photo courtesy of San Diego Zoo Global

`Alala. Photo courtesy of San Diego Zoo Global

Evening Presentation:

Through intensive conservation efforts, twenty-one ‘Alalā—the endemic and endangered Hawaiian Crow once considered extinct in the wild—have been reintroduced into native Hawaiian forests.  These efforts are ongoing and plans are well under way for the next reintroduction. 

Rachel Kingsley, Education and Outreach Associate for The ‘Alalā Project, provides information about this unique species, an update on the birds that were recently reintroduced, and plans for future efforts to restore our beloved bird to its natural, wild home.  Join us to learn more about this remarkable, highly intelligent crow species—integral to native Hawaiian ecosystems and culture—on two occasions:  Monday evening, April 15, and the following afternoon, April 16.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers.  Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge!  Seating is limited; first come, first seated.  ON MONDAY EVENINGS ONLY, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

Apr
16
Tue
Return to the Wild, One Year Later: Updating Us on Reintroducing the ‘Alalā to Their Forests! @ Lyman Museum
Apr 16 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm
`Alala. Photo courtesy of San Diego Zoo Global

`Alala. Photo courtesy of San Diego Zoo Global

Matinée Presentation:

Through intensive conservation efforts, twenty-one ‘Alalā—the endemic and endangered Hawaiian Crow once considered extinct in the wild—have been reintroduced into native Hawaiian forests.  These efforts are ongoing and plans are well under way for the next reintroduction. 

Rachel Kingsley, Education and Outreach Associate for The ‘Alalā Project, provides information about this unique species, an update on the birds that were recently reintroduced, and plans for future efforts to restore our beloved bird to its natural, wild home.  Join us to learn more about this remarkable, highly intelligent crow species—integral to native Hawaiian ecosystems and culture—on two occasions:  Monday evening, April 15, and the following afternoon, April 16.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers.  Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge!  Seating is limited; first come, first seated.  ON MONDAY EVENINGS ONLY, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

Apr
29
Mon
The Portuguese and Hawai‘i @ Lyman Museum
Apr 29 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Evening Presentation:

Four hundred years ago, Portugal was a very powerful and wealthy nation … so why did large segments of its population leave to seek better lives elsewhere?  And why did entire families brave treacherous, five-month-long sea voyages to travel halfway around the globe to Hawai‘i?  Was what they found here worth the sacrifice?  And, after 150 years in the Islands, what has been their legacy?  Local historian and teacher Tom Goltz presents this compelling program twice:  Monday evening, April 29, and the following afternoon, April 30.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers.  Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge!  Seating is limited; first come, first seated.  ON MONDAY EVENINGS ONLY, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

Apr
30
Tue
The Portuguese and Hawai‘i @ Lyman Museum
Apr 30 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm

Matinée Presentation:

Four hundred years ago, Portugal was a very powerful and wealthy nation … so why did large segments of its population leave to seek better lives elsewhere?  And why did entire families brave treacherous, five-month-long sea voyages to travel halfway around the globe to Hawai‘i?  Was what they found here worth the sacrifice?  And, after 150 years in the Islands, what has been their legacy?  Local historian and teacher Tom Goltz presents this compelling program twice:  Monday evening, April 29, and the following afternoon, April 30.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers.  Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge!  Seating is limited; first come, first seated.  ON MONDAY EVENINGS ONLY, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

May
13
Mon
Hawaiian Mission Houses Presents: Hawai‘i Island History Theatre @ Lyman Museum
May 13 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm
Kahana Ho as Emma Nawah

Kahana Ho as Emma Nawah

Evening Presentation:

History Theatre is a program that engages us with history through the personal stories of people who lived it.  Using archival resources such as letters, journals, newspapers, and other reports, Hawaiian Mission Houses develops portrayals of actual figures from Hawai‘i’s history and presents them to the community. 

This particular program focuses on three people with ties to Hawai‘i Island:  Curtis Pi‘ehu I‘aukea (1855—1940), a Waimea boy who grew up to serve the Kingdom, Provisional Government, and Territory; Emma ‘A‘ima Nāwahī (1854—1934), born in Hilo and politically active in the opposition to the overthrow and annexation of the Kingdom; and Simon Peter Kalama (1815—1874), friend and assistant to Dr. Gerrit Judd, renowned local physician and scientist.  These historical characters and their stories are brought to life by (respectively) Albert Ueligitone, Kahana Ho, and Moses Goods, on two occasions:  Monday evening, May 13, and the following afternoon, May 14.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers.  Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge!  Seating is limited; first come, first seated.  ON MONDAY EVENINGS ONLY, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

 

May
14
Tue
Hawaiian Mission Houses Presents: Hawai‘i Island History Theatre @ Lyman Museum
May 14 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm
Kahana Ho as Emma Nawah

Kahana Ho as Emma Nawah

Matinée Presentation:

History Theatre is a program that engages us with history through the personal stories of people who lived it.  Using archival resources such as letters, journals, newspapers, and other reports, Hawaiian Mission Houses develops portrayals of actual figures from Hawai‘i’s history and presents them to the community. 

This particular program focuses on three people with ties to Hawai‘i Island:  Curtis Pi‘ehu I‘aukea (1855—1940), a Waimea boy who grew up to serve the Kingdom, Provisional Government, and Territory; Emma ‘A‘ima Nāwahī (1854—1934), born in Hilo and politically active in the opposition to the overthrow and annexation of the Kingdom; and Simon Peter Kalama (1815—1874), friend and assistant to Dr. Gerrit Judd, renowned local physician and scientist.  These historical characters and their stories are brought to life by (respectively) Albert Ueligitone, Kahana Ho, and Moses Goods, on two occasions:  Monday evening, May 13, and the following afternoon, May 14.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers.  Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge!  Seating is limited; first come, first seated.  ON MONDAY EVENINGS ONLY, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

 

May
20
Mon
Heiau, ‘Āina, Lani: New Insights into Ancient Hawaiian Temples @ Lyman Museum
May 20 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Evening Presentation:

For more than two decades Dr. Patrick Kirch has explored the archaeological landscapes of Kahikinui and Kaupō in southeast Maui, seeking to reconstruct the lifeways of the kua‘āina kahiko who inhabited these vast dryland regions.  Among his discoveries are some 78 heiau or temple sites, ranging from small coastal fishing shrines, through agricultural fertility temples, to the imposing war temples of Lo‘alo‘a and Pōpō‘iwi, where Maui king Kekaulike offered up human sacrifices.  Building on his detailed mapping and study of these temple foundations, Kirch collaborated with archaeo-astronomer Clive Ruggles in an effort to understand how heiau served not only as places of sacrifice and prayer, but also as locations where kāhuna observed the heavens.  Observing the rising of the Pleiades (Makali‘i) and probably also the solstices allowed the kāhuna to calibrate the Hawaiian lunar calendar, keeping it in sync with the solar year. 

Twice in May, Kirch will share these insights into the function of heiau in ancient Hawaiian culture and society:  Monday evening, May 20, and the following afternoon, May 21.  Copies of his just-published book on this subject will be available in the Museum Shop, and Dr. Kirch will be happy to inscribe them.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers.  Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge!  Seating is limited; first come, first seated.  ON MONDAY EVENINGS ONLY, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

 

May
21
Tue
Heiau, ‘Āina, Lani: New Insights into Ancient Hawaiian Temples @ Lyman Museum
May 21 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm

Matinée Presentation:

For more than two decades Dr. Patrick Kirch has explored the archaeological landscapes of Kahikinui and Kaupō in southeast Maui, seeking to reconstruct the lifeways of the kua‘āina kahiko who inhabited these vast dryland regions.  Among his discoveries are some 78 heiau or temple sites, ranging from small coastal fishing shrines, through agricultural fertility temples, to the imposing war temples of Lo‘alo‘a and Pōpō‘iwi, where Maui king Kekaulike offered up human sacrifices.  Building on his detailed mapping and study of these temple foundations, Kirch collaborated with archaeo-astronomer Clive Ruggles in an effort to understand how heiau served not only as places of sacrifice and prayer, but also as locations where kāhuna observed the heavens.  Observing the rising of the Pleiades (Makali‘i) and probably also the solstices allowed the kāhuna to calibrate the Hawaiian lunar calendar, keeping it in sync with the solar year. 

Twice in May, Kirch will share these insights into the function of heiau in ancient Hawaiian culture and society:  Monday evening, May 20, and the following afternoon, May 21.  Copies of his just-published book on this subject will be available in the Museum Shop, and Dr. Kirch will be happy to inscribe them.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers.  Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge!  Seating is limited; first come, first seated.  ON MONDAY EVENINGS ONLY, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

 

Jun
24
Mon
Dig In: Discover How to Cultivate Healthy Soil @ Lyman Museum
Jun 24 @ 3:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Matinée and Evening presentation (ONE DATE ONLY):

Hey, soil is more than just “dirt”!  Soil is alive, a diverse ecosystem made up of organic matter, minerals, roots, worms, microbes, and much more!  Soil tells the story of the iconic landscapes of the Hawaiian Islands, layer by layer, from the surface down to the rock below.  It can also tell us the story of past use and management, and how that has affected the overall health of the soil. 

Amy Koch, Soil Scientist from the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, tells us why it is important to protect soil as one of our natural resources, and highlights the vital importance (to all of us) of healthy soil.  Come learn how to tell if a soil is healthy and what you can do to enhance soil health (whether in a community garden, large or small farm, or your own backyard), twice on Monday, June 24 (afternoon and evening).  We promise you will never see “dirt” in quite the same way!

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers.  Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge!  Seating is limited; first come, first seated.  ON MONDAY EVENINGS ONLY, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

AmazonSmile