Events

Feb
17
Mon
New Discoveries in Hawai‘i’s Lava Tubes @ Lyman Museum
Feb 17 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Evening Presentation:

Who dares describe Hawai‘i’s iconic lava tubes as fossilized tunnels, bereft of life?!  Since 2015, UH-Mānoa’s Dr. Megan Porter and a team of cave biologists from around the U.S. have been studying the communities of animals living in lava tubes on the island of Hawai‘i.  In general, such ecosystems existing on our volcanoes of different ages consist of very similar assemblages of invertebrates—planthoppers, spiders, millipedes, crickets, and others—all dependent on roots penetrating the lava tube from surface forests above.  Molecular tools have helped identify the roots in these systems as being mostly ‘Ōhi‘a, linking Hawaiian subterranean ecosystems directly to the surface forest landscape.  In surveys of lava tube systems not previously studied for biology, the research team has discovered a remarkable number of new species, including unique cave-adapted planthoppers, beetles, cave treaders, and thread-legged bugs (who knew?!).  These new discoveries highlight the singularity of Hawaiian lava tube ecosystems, and how they are intimately connected to conservation of native forests on the surface.  Learn all about these creatures and their nether world, on two occasions:  Monday evening, February 17, and the following afternoon, February 18.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers.  Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge!  Seating is limited; first come, first seated.  ON MONDAY EVENINGS ONLY, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

Feb
18
Tue
New Discoveries in Hawai‘i’s Lava Tubes @ Lyman Museum
Feb 18 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm

Matinée Presentation:

Who dares describe Hawai‘i’s iconic lava tubes as fossilized tunnels, bereft of life?!  Since 2015, UH-Mānoa’s Dr. Megan Porter and a team of cave biologists from around the U.S. have been studying the communities of animals living in lava tubes on the island of Hawai‘i.  In general, such ecosystems existing on our volcanoes of different ages consist of very similar assemblages of invertebrates—planthoppers, spiders, millipedes, crickets, and others—all dependent on roots penetrating the lava tube from surface forests above.  Molecular tools have helped identify the roots in these systems as being mostly ‘Ōhi‘a, linking Hawaiian subterranean ecosystems directly to the surface forest landscape.  In surveys of lava tube systems not previously studied for biology, the research team has discovered a remarkable number of new species, including unique cave-adapted planthoppers, beetles, cave treaders, and thread-legged bugs (who knew?!).  These new discoveries highlight the singularity of Hawaiian lava tube ecosystems, and how they are intimately connected to conservation of native forests on the surface.  Learn all about these creatures and their nether world, on two occasions:  Monday evening, February 17, and the following afternoon, February 18.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers.  Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge!  Seating is limited; first come, first seated.  ON MONDAY EVENINGS ONLY, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

Mar
9
Mon
Dark Skies and Hawai‘i’s Wildlife @ Lyman Museum
Mar 9 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Evening Presentation:

What happens to Hawai‘i’s wildlife when we turn on—or off—the lights?  For billions of years, life on Earth evolved according to nature’s rhythm of daylight and darkness; animals and plants evolved their circadian rhythms to sun-illuminated days and to dark skies bearing the distant light of stars and the moon at night.  For some species, nightfall meant rest; for others, activity.  Then, in 1879, Thomas Edison debuted his brilliant bulb, and darkness began a steady retreat.  Since then, the presence of light at night has affected animals and plants in unanticipated ways.  Jay Penniman, of the Maui Nui Seabird Recovery Project, discusses some of these documented impacts, with a focus on Hawai‘i’s wildlife and particularly the native seabirds of our islands—as well as ways in which everyone can help minimize light pollution and its effects on wildlife—on two occasions:  Monday evening, March 9, and the following afternoon, March 10.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers.  Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge!  Seating is limited; first come, first seated.  ON MONDAY EVENINGS ONLY, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

Mar
10
Tue
Dark Skies and Hawai‘i’s Wildlife @ Lyman Museum
Mar 10 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm

Matinée Presentation:

What happens to Hawai‘i’s wildlife when we turn on—or off—the lights?  For billions of years, life on Earth evolved according to nature’s rhythm of daylight and darkness; animals and plants evolved their circadian rhythms to sun-illuminated days and to dark skies bearing the distant light of stars and the moon at night.  For some species, nightfall meant rest; for others, activity.  Then, in 1879, Thomas Edison debuted his brilliant bulb, and darkness began a steady retreat.  Since then, the presence of light at night has affected animals and plants in unanticipated ways.  Jay Penniman, of the Maui Nui Seabird Recovery Project, discusses some of these documented impacts, with a focus on Hawai‘i’s wildlife and particularly the native seabirds of our islands—as well as ways in which everyone can help minimize light pollution and its effects on wildlife—on two occasions:  Monday evening, March 9, and the following afternoon, March 10.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers.  Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge!  Seating is limited; first come, first seated.  ON MONDAY EVENINGS ONLY, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

Mar
16
Mon
Aloha Rodeo: Three Hawaiian Cowboys, the World’s Greatest Rodeo, and a Hidden History of the American West @ Lyman Museum
Mar 16 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Evening Presentation:

How many Americans know that there were cowboys in Hawai‘i long before cowboys roamed the Great Plains?  Or that a Native Hawaiian took the world championship in steer roping from the favorite sons of Wyoming in the early years of the 20th century?  Or that this young man and his two cousins became national celebrities, and in so doing refuted deep-seated notions of racial and cultural superiority?  Aloha Rodeo, by David Wolman and Julian Smith, was published in 2019 to national acclaim, and tells the extraordinary story of the Hawaiian cowboys who became rodeo champions, challenging the mythology of the American West.  Experience this story as told and illustrated by David Wolman, on two occasions:  Monday evening, March 16, and the following afternoon, March 17.  Copies of this exceptional book will be available for purchase, and Mr. Wolman will be happy to inscribe them.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers.  Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge!  Seating is limited; first come, first seated.  ON MONDAY EVENINGS ONLY, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

Mar
17
Tue
Aloha Rodeo: Three Hawaiian Cowboys, the World’s Greatest Rodeo, and a Hidden History of the American West @ Lyman Museum
Mar 17 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm

Matinée Presentation:

How many Americans know that there were cowboys in Hawai‘i long before cowboys roamed the Great Plains?  Or that a Native Hawaiian took the world championship in steer roping from the favorite sons of Wyoming in the early years of the 20th century?  Or that this young man and his two cousins became national celebrities, and in so doing refuted deep-seated notions of racial and cultural superiority?  Aloha Rodeo, by David Wolman and Julian Smith, was published in 2019 to national acclaim, and tells the extraordinary story of the Hawaiian cowboys who became rodeo champions, challenging the mythology of the American West.  Experience this story as told and illustrated by David Wolman, on two occasions:  Monday evening, March 16, and the following afternoon, March 17.  Copies of this exceptional book will be available for purchase, and Mr. Wolman will be happy to inscribe them.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers.  Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge!  Seating is limited; first come, first seated.  ON MONDAY EVENINGS ONLY, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

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