Events

Oct
17
Tue
Fashion Sense in the Kalākaua Dynasty @ Lyman Museum
Oct 17 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm

VO3A4230-4Matinée presentation:

It’s hard to believe that only a matter of decades separated the simple yet beautiful traditional Native Hawaiian clothing from what is now known as the Belle Époque style of the late Victorian and early Edwardian periods in Europe … a style embraced by Hawai‘i’s royalty and visible in photographs of the era.  As the ali‘i adopted Western ideas, technologies, faiths, and forms of government, so they made European fashions their own.  This is a unique, joint PowerPoint presentation and live modeling of garments reproduced by Irisgil Viacrusis in the first phase of a very special project for the ‘Iolani Palace:  Queen Kapi‘olani’s Lei Hulu and Peacock gowns, and Queen Lili‘uokalani’s Coronation and Ribbon gowns.  It covers their individual histories, including how the garments were reconstructed from the pieces preserved in the Bishop Museum.  Related featherwork and fabric are shown, and live models demonstrate how such garments were supported by undergarments, corsets, bustles, and petticoats.  Iris also gives us a glimpse at the second phase of this one-of-a-kind project:  Kings’ clothing, Queen Lili‘uokalani’s Summer Whites and Traveling Suit, plus Princess Ka‘iulani’s Gibson Ball Gown.   See how our ali‘i represented the Hawaiian Kingdom to the rest of the world through the Victorian—Edwardian etiquette of “dressing the part,” on either of two occasions:  Monday evening, October 16, or a “matinée” on the following afternoon, October 17.

Free to Lyman Museum members; $3 nonmembers. 

Doors open at 6:30 p.m. for evening public programs.  Limited seating; first come, first seated.  Additional parking next door at Hilo Union School ON MONDAY EVENING ONLY

Oct
20
Fri
Ni‘ihau Shell Workshops @ Lyman Museum
Oct 20 @ 10:00 am – 4:00 pm
Ni‘ihau jewelry in the ponapona style

Ni‘ihau jewelry in the ponapona style

Master craftsman and artist, Kele Kanahele of the Island of Ni‘ihau, has created—for the first time ever!—a set of original Ni‘ihau shell jewelry designs in the breathtaking colors of Ni‘ihau’s native “gems” … and he can teach you how to make your own pieces in this ponapona style at the Lyman Museum!  Visit his acclaimed workshop twice in October:

 Friday, October 20                                                    10:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M.
Saturday, October 21                                               10:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M.

On either day you will learn how to make a 22-inch necklace/lei, or a pair of earrings, or a bracelet, in the new ponapona style, using both black poleho and the more rare honey-gold poleho shells—both augmented with your choice of momi ke‘oke‘o or momi lenalena shells.  Prices vary according to Museum membership, but are exceptionally reasonable!  You may, of course, create more than one piece, as long as you sign up for specific pieces in advance.  You may also create the entire 4-piece set for less than it would cost to make the pieces individually!  Space is limited to 24 persons per day; only people who have registered can be permitted in the classroom.  Reservations must be made, pieces and shell colors specified, and the workshop fee(s) paid by Friday, October 13, to ensure your place and the availability of shells. 

Learn to create these one-of-a-kind treasures of Ni‘ihau from a master—and give a uniquely Hawaiian gift (to yourself, perhaps?)!  For pricing and other information, please call 935-5021 ext. 101 or stop by the Museum’s Admissions desk. 

Oct
21
Sat
Ni‘ihau Shell Workshops @ Lyman Museum
Oct 21 @ 10:00 am – 4:00 pm
Ni‘ihau jewelry in the ponapona style

Ni‘ihau jewelry in the ponapona style

Master craftsman and artist, Kele Kanahele of the Island of Ni‘ihau, has created—for the first time ever!—a set of original Ni‘ihau shell jewelry designs in the breathtaking colors of Ni‘ihau’s native “gems” … and he can teach you how to make your own pieces in this ponapona style at the Lyman Museum!  Visit his acclaimed workshop twice in October:

 Friday, October 20                                                    10:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M.
Saturday, October 21                                               10:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M.

On either day you will learn how to make a 22-inch necklace/lei, or a pair of earrings, or a bracelet, in the new ponapona style, using both black poleho and the more rare honey-gold poleho shells—both augmented with your choice of momi ke‘oke‘o or momi lenalena shells.  Prices vary according to Museum membership, but are exceptionally reasonable!  You may, of course, create more than one piece, as long as you sign up for specific pieces in advance.  You may also create the entire 4-piece set for less than it would cost to make the pieces individually!  Space is limited to 24 persons per day; only people who have registered can be permitted in the classroom.  Reservations must be made, pieces and shell colors specified, and the workshop fee(s) paid by Friday, October 13, to ensure your place and the availability of shells. 

Learn to create these one-of-a-kind treasures of Ni‘ihau from a master—and give a uniquely Hawaiian gift (to yourself, perhaps?)!  For pricing and other information, please call 935-5021 ext. 101 or stop by the Museum’s Admissions desk. 

Oct
30
Mon
The Hawaiian Translation of the Bible: Its Makers, History, and Influence @ Lyman Museum
Oct 30 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm

Matinée presentation:

The 1839 translation of the Bible into the Hawaiian language from Hebrew and Greek was the single greatest literary project ever undertaken in Hawaiian.  It required more than a decade of intense cooperation between an elite team of American Bible scholars, trained in the latest scholarship of their day, and a group of Hawaiian-language experts and editors composed of high-ranking ali‘i and their top advisors—perhaps the most eloquent team of Hawaiian speakers ever assembled for a single project.  Together they produced a Bible translation superior to what either group could have accomplished on its own, and one of the great Bible translations of the 19th century.  Dr. Kapali Lyon, Chair of the Department of Religion at UH-Mānoa, has conducted extensive research and written compellingly on this singular achievement.  Who were the groundbreaking individuals whose dedication and collaborative effort made Ka Baibala Hemolele a reality … and how exactly did that come about?  Learn more at either the afternoon or the evening presentation of this thought-provoking program on October 30.

Free to Lyman Museum members; $3 nonmembers. 

Doors open at 6:30 p.m. for evening public programs.  Limited seating; first come, first seated.  Additional parking next door at Hilo Union School ON MONDAY EVENING ONLY

The Hawaiian Translation of the Bible: Its Makers, History, and Influence @ Lyman Museum
Oct 30 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Evening presentation:

The 1839 translation of the Bible into the Hawaiian language from Hebrew and Greek was the single greatest literary project ever undertaken in Hawaiian.  It required more than a decade of intense cooperation between an elite team of American Bible scholars, trained in the latest scholarship of their day, and a group of Hawaiian-language experts and editors composed of high-ranking ali‘i and their top advisors—perhaps the most eloquent team of Hawaiian speakers ever assembled for a single project.  Together they produced a Bible translation superior to what either group could have accomplished on its own, and one of the great Bible translations of the 19th century.  Dr. Kapali Lyon, Chair of the Department of Religion at UH-Mānoa, has conducted extensive research and written compellingly on this singular achievement.  Who were the groundbreaking individuals whose dedication and collaborative effort made Ka Baibala Hemolele a reality … and how exactly did that come about?  Learn more at either the afternoon or the evening presentation of this thought-provoking program on October 30.

Free to Lyman Museum members; $3 nonmembers. 

Doors open at 6:30 p.m. for evening public programs.  Limited seating; first come, first seated.  Additional parking next door at Hilo Union School ON MONDAY EVENING ONLY

Nov
13
Mon
Light in the Queen’s Garden: Ida May Pope, Pioneer for Hawai‘i’s Daughters, 1862—1914 @ Lyman Museum
Nov 13 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Evening presentation:

At the close of the 1800s, when Oberlin College graduate Ida May Pope accepted a teaching job at Kawaiaha‘o Seminary, a boarding school for girls in Honolulu, she could not have imagined it would herald a lifelong career of service to Hawaiian women, or that she would become closely involved in the political turmoil soon to sweep over the Kingdom.  Noted researcher and writer Sandra (Sandee) Bonura has just published a beautiful and sensitive biography of Pope, using recently discovered primary sources to give—for the first time—a firsthand, day-by-day account of the events surrounding the 1893 Revolution, through the eyes of Pope’s young pupils … a coup d’etat that took place literally outside the school’s windows.  Bonura shares this unique history—and will be happy to inscribe copies of her book—on two occasions:  Monday evening, November 13, and a “matinée” on the following afternoon, Tuesday, November 14.

Free to Lyman Museum members; $3 nonmembers. 

Doors open at 6:30 p.m. for evening public programs.  Limited seating; first come, first seated.  Additional parking next door at Hilo Union School ON MONDAY EVENING ONLY

 

Nov
14
Tue
Light in the Queen’s Garden: Ida May Pope, Pioneer for Hawai‘i’s Daughters, 1862—1914 @ Lyman Museum
Nov 14 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm

Matinée presentation:

At the close of the 1800s, when Oberlin College graduate Ida May Pope accepted a teaching job at Kawaiaha‘o Seminary, a boarding school for girls in Honolulu, she could not have imagined it would herald a lifelong career of service to Hawaiian women, or that she would become closely involved in the political turmoil soon to sweep over the Kingdom.  Noted researcher and writer Sandra (Sandee) Bonura has just published a beautiful and sensitive biography of Pope, using recently discovered primary sources to give—for the first time—a firsthand, day-by-day account of the events surrounding the 1893 Revolution, through the eyes of Pope’s young pupils … a coup d’etat that took place literally outside the school’s windows.  Bonura shares this unique history—and will be happy to inscribe copies of her book—on two occasions:  Monday evening, November 13, and a “matinée” on the following afternoon, Tuesday, November 14.

Free to Lyman Museum members; $3 nonmembers. 

Doors open at 6:30 p.m. for evening public programs.  Limited seating; first come, first seated.  Additional parking next door at Hilo Union School ON MONDAY EVENING ONLY

 

Nov
27
Mon
From the Brink of Extinction: Saving Rare Plants at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park @ Lyman Museum
Nov 27 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm

36014597566_6e3890d smlMatinée presentation:

Some of the world’s rarest plants are found in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, a place where more than 100 years of preservation and protection efforts have created an optimal environment in which they can survive and thrive.  The native silversword and lobelia lineages of Hawai‘i are spectacular examples of adaptive radiation, in which single colonizing ancestors have given rise to a stunning diversity of descendant species … yet they now include some of the world’s most critically imperiled plants.  Over the past two decades, park managers have partnered with public and private organizations to pull these species back from the brink of extinction through large-scale plant reintroduction efforts.  This afternoon and evening, HVNP botanist Sierra McDaniel discusses and illustrates the value of integrating these crucial efforts with ongoing restoration activities across large landscapes.

Free to Lyman Museum members; $3 nonmembers. 

Doors open at 6:30 p.m. for evening public programs.  Limited seating; first come, first seated.  Additional parking next door at Hilo Union School ON MONDAY EVENING ONLY

From the Brink of Extinction: Saving Rare Plants at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park @ Lyman Museum
Nov 27 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

36014597566_6e3890d smlEvening presentation:

Some of the world’s rarest plants are found in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, a place where more than 100 years of preservation and protection efforts have created an optimal environment in which they can survive and thrive.  The native silversword and lobelia lineages of Hawai‘i are spectacular examples of adaptive radiation, in which single colonizing ancestors have given rise to a stunning diversity of descendant species … yet they now include some of the world’s most critically imperiled plants.  Over the past two decades, park managers have partnered with public and private organizations to pull these species back from the brink of extinction through large-scale plant reintroduction efforts.  This afternoon and evening, HVNP botanist Sierra McDaniel discusses and illustrates the value of integrating these crucial efforts with ongoing restoration activities across large landscapes.

Free to Lyman Museum members; $3 nonmembers. 

Doors open at 6:30 p.m. for evening public programs.  Limited seating; first come, first seated.  Additional parking next door at Hilo Union School ON MONDAY EVENING ONLY

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