Events

Feb
18
Mon
The Journey Continues: Lives of Portuguese Immigrant Descendants, 2018 @ Lyman Museum
Feb 18 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Evening Presentation:

In September 2017 the Hawai‘i Island Portuguese Chamber of Commerce celebrated the 140th anniversary of the arrival of Portuguese immigrants to Hawai‘i.  Commemorative events included special performances by local actors enacting living histories of some descendants of the 1878 immigrants.  The scripts that featured their life stories were prepared by retired UH-Hilo drama professor Jackie Pualani Johnson, who interviewed the descendants themselves in order to capture the values and lifestyle of the Portuguese in East Hawai‘i. 

Featured in the living histories are Norbert and Erma Serrao (of Hilo and Pa‘auilo, respectively), portrayed by Beth and Edward Andrade of Hilo; and Dolores Tavares (formerly of Lahaina and Pāhoa), personified by Gabriella Cabanas of Hilo.  Their performances give us a feel for what life was like for these Portuguese families, sharing tidbits from earlier generations about everyday activities and the choices they made to build families and careers.  Anecdotes about life on the Big Island tell of devotion to family and church, including the sacrifices made to ensure a better future for the next generation. 

Enjoy these heartfelt portrayals on either of two occasions: Monday evening, February 18, or the following afternoon, February 19.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers.  Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge!  Seating is limited; first come, first seated.  ON MONDAY EVENINGS ONLY, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

Feb
19
Tue
The Journey Continues: Lives of Portuguese Immigrant Descendants, 2018 @ Lyman Museum
Feb 19 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm

Matinée presentation:

In September 2017 the Hawai‘i Island Portuguese Chamber of Commerce celebrated the 140th anniversary of the arrival of Portuguese immigrants to Hawai‘i.  Commemorative events included special performances by local actors enacting living histories of some descendants of the 1878 immigrants.  The scripts that featured their life stories were prepared by retired UH-Hilo drama professor Jackie Pualani Johnson, who interviewed the descendants themselves in order to capture the values and lifestyle of the Portuguese in East Hawai‘i. 

Featured in the living histories are Norbert and Erma Serrao (of Hilo and Pa‘auilo, respectively), portrayed by Beth and Edward Andrade of Hilo; and Dolores Tavares (formerly of Lahaina and Pāhoa), personified by Gabriella Cabanas of Hilo.  Their performances give us a feel for what life was like for these Portuguese families, sharing tidbits from earlier generations about everyday activities and the choices they made to build families and careers.  Anecdotes about life on the Big Island tell of devotion to family and church, including the sacrifices made to ensure a better future for the next generation. 

Enjoy these heartfelt portrayals on either of two occasions: Monday evening, February 18, or the following afternoon, February 19.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers.  Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge!  Seating is limited; first come, first seated.  ON MONDAY EVENINGS ONLY, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

Mar
4
Mon
Pride and Prejudice on Kaua‘i: The Controversy Behind the Renaming of “Russian Fort Elizabeth State Historical Park,” Waimea @ Lyman Museum
Mar 4 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Figure 9. View on the fortress from a bird's eye view (002)Evening Presentation:

An international controversy is brewing over the proposed renaming of the Russian Fort Elizabeth State Historical Park on Kaua‘i to “Pā‘ula‘ula/Fort Elizabeth.” A book by UH-Hilo’s Dr. Peter MillsHawai‘i’s Russian Adventure: A New Look at Old History (UH Press, 2002)—clarifies that the fort was built by Hawaiians as part of King Kaumuali‘i’s own residential compound in 1816-1817, when Kaumuali‘i formed an alliance with Dr. George Anton Schäffer of the Russian-American Company (RAC). For a brief period (less than a year), the RAC gained a sandalwood monopoly on Kaua‘i and a base for food and cash-crop production while Kaumuali‘i swore allegiance to Russian Emperor Alexander I. Schäffer provided designs for the walls of the fort in Waimea, and named it Fort Elizabeth (after Alexander I’s wife)—but the fort was occupied by Kaumuali‘i, never by Russians, and then used for a half century by the Hawaiian monarchy, whose Hawaiian soldiers called it Pā‘ula‘ula. On August 8, 1824 the fort became the location of one of the most important battles in history between Hawaiian chiefs; and the ali‘i also chose to use it as a burial ground for Kaumuali‘i’s grandson and for Kaua‘i’s first governor, Kaikio‘ewa.

Dr. Mills explains the ongoing controversy that has prompted the Russian Ambassador to the U.S., Anatoly Antanov, and thousands of Russians and Russian-Americans to protest the proposed renaming of this historic site on Hawai‘i Island. Learn more about it on either of two occasions: Monday evening, March 4, or the following afternoon, March 5.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers.  Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge!  Seating is limited; first come, first seated.  ON MONDAY EVENINGS ONLY, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

Mar
5
Tue
Pride and Prejudice on Kaua‘i: The Controversy Behind the Renaming of “Russian Fort Elizabeth State Historical Park,” Waimea @ Lyman Museum
Mar 5 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm

Figure 9. View on the fortress from a bird's eye view (002)Matinée presentation:

An international controversy is brewing over the proposed renaming of the Russian Fort Elizabeth State Historical Park on Kaua‘i to “Pā‘ula‘ula/Fort Elizabeth.” A book by UH-Hilo’s Dr. Peter MillsHawai‘i’s Russian Adventure: A New Look at Old History (UH Press, 2002)—clarifies that the fort was built by Hawaiians as part of King Kaumuali‘i’s own residential compound in 1816-1817, when Kaumuali‘i formed an alliance with Dr. George Anton Schäffer of the Russian-American Company (RAC). For a brief period (less than a year), the RAC gained a sandalwood monopoly on Kaua‘i and a base for food and cash-crop production while Kaumuali‘i swore allegiance to Russian Emperor Alexander I. Schäffer provided designs for the walls of the fort in Waimea, and named it Fort Elizabeth (after Alexander I’s wife)—but the fort was occupied by Kaumuali‘i, never by Russians, and then used for a half century by the Hawaiian monarchy, whose Hawaiian soldiers called it Pā‘ula‘ula. On August 8, 1824 the fort became the location of one of the most important battles in history between Hawaiian chiefs; and the ali‘i also chose to use it as a burial ground for Kaumuali‘i’s grandson and for Kaua‘i’s first governor, Kaikio‘ewa.

Dr. Mills explains the ongoing controversy that has prompted the Russian Ambassador to the U.S., Anatoly Antanov, and thousands of Russians and Russian-Americans to protest the proposed renaming of this historic site on Hawai‘i Island. Learn more about it on either of two occasions: Monday evening, March 4, or the following afternoon, March 5.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers.  Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge!  Seating is limited; first come, first seated.  ON MONDAY EVENINGS ONLY, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

Mar
25
Mon
It Takes a Hui: Protecting Hawai‘i’s White Terns @ Lyman Museum
Mar 25 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm
Photo by David Dow

Photo by David Dow

Matinée and Evening presentation (ONE DATE ONLY):

In 1961, only a single pair of white terns (formerly called fairy terns) nested in Honolulu.  Over the decades, these lovely seabirds continued to choose urban Honolulu as a place to raise chicks.  Today, at 2,300 and counting, white terns nest throughout the city’s introduced trees, ranging throughout Waikiki, the Civic Center, Mānoa, and beyond. 

Naturalist and author Susan Scott brings us a PowerPoint presentation featuring her latest book—White Tern, Manu-O-Ku, and Urban Seabird (UH Press, 2018)—in which she tells us “how citizen scientists, researchers, government employees, educators, wildlife groups, writers, photographers, tree trimmers, birders, office workers, condo dwellers, and others came together to help Hawaii’s white terns.” 

Twice on March 25 (afternoon and evening), Scott shares the heartwarming story of people gathering together to protect this cherished seabird.  Copies of her book will be available in the Museum Shop, and Scott will be happy to inscribe them.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers.  Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge!  Seating is limited; first come, first seated.  ON MONDAY EVENINGS ONLY, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

AmazonSmile