Events

May
1
Mon
The Very Latest on the ‘Alalā. @ Lyman Museum
May 1 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm

Matinée presentation:

Our endemic Hawaiian crow, the ‘alalā, once made its home across the length and breadth of Hawai‘i Island, but today, owing to a variety of threats in the wild, these birds are found only in captivity.  Happily, successful captive breeding and conservation efforts have helped to rescue this native Hawaiian species from the brink of extinction.  But the ‘alalā still faces many challenges on the road to recovery.  Reintroduction efforts began last December with the release of five birds into a Hawai‘i Island State Natural Area Reserve, but ultimately were not successful.  Biologists worldwide report that progress in such releases usually occurs in fits and starts, and that reintroduction success is usually not seen before multiple releases.  Lea Ka‘aha‘aina, education and outreach specialist for DLNR’s The ‘Alalā Project, returns to give us an up-to-the-minute update on the status of their efforts, the planned upcoming release of an additional 12 birds, and how physical conditioning and predator-aversion training are helping to prepare the released ‘alalā for survival in the wild.  This beautifully illustrated program is being presented in the afternoon, and again on the evening of May 1, demonstrating how collaborative projects across our State can help preserve and protect the unique biodiversity of the Hawaiian Islands.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers. 

Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge! 

Seating is limited; first come, first seated. 

On Monday evenings only, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall.

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

The Very Latest on the ‘Alalā. @ Lyman Museum
May 1 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Evening presentation:

Our endemic Hawaiian crow, the ‘alalā, once made its home across the length and breadth of Hawai‘i Island, but today, owing to a variety of threats in the wild, these birds are found only in captivity.  Happily, successful captive breeding and conservation efforts have helped to rescue this native Hawaiian species from the brink of extinction.  But the ‘alalā still faces many challenges on the road to recovery.  Reintroduction efforts began last December with the release of five birds into a Hawai‘i Island State Natural Area Reserve, but ultimately were not successful.  Biologists worldwide report that progress in such releases usually occurs in fits and starts, and that reintroduction success is usually not seen before multiple releases.  Lea Ka‘aha‘aina, education and outreach specialist for DLNR’s The ‘Alalā Project, returns to give us an up-to-the-minute update on the status of their efforts, the planned upcoming release of an additional 12 birds, and how physical conditioning and predator-aversion training are helping to prepare the released ‘alalā for survival in the wild.  This beautifully illustrated program is being presented in the afternoon, and again on the evening of May 1, demonstrating how collaborative projects across our State can help preserve and protect the unique biodiversity of the Hawaiian Islands.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers. 

Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge! 

Seating is limited; first come, first seated. 

On Monday evenings only, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall.

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

May
8
Mon
Kīkā Kila: How the Hawaiian Steel Guitar Changed the Sound of Modern Music.  @ Lyman Museum
May 8 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm

Matinée presentation:

Since the 19th century the distinctive tones of kīkā kila, the Hawaiian steel guitar, have defined the Island sound.  This program—and the recently published book of the same title—present the instrument’s definitive history, from its discovery by a young Hawaiian royalist named Joseph Kekuku to its revolutionary influence on American and world music.  During the 20th century Hawaiian musicians traveled the globe, from tent shows in the Mississippi Delta where they shaped the new sounds of country and the blues, to regal theaters and vaudeville stages in New York, Berlin, Kolkata, and beyond.  In the process, Hawaiian guitarists recast the role of the guitar in modern life.  But by the 1970s the instrument’s embrace and adoption overseas also challenged its cultural legitimacy in the eyes of a new generation of Hawaiian musicians—and the indigenous instrument nearly disappeared in its homeland.  Dr. John Troutman, Curator of American Music at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History (and himself a steel guitarist), uses rich musical and historical sources to share the comprehensive story of how this Native Hawaiian instrument transformed not only American music but the sounds of modern music throughout the world.  Indulge your enjoyment of this very special musical form at either the afternoon or the evening presentation of this not-to-be-missed program on May 8.  Copies of his unique book will be available in the Museum Shop, and Dr. Troutman will be happy to inscribe them.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers. 

Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge! 

Seating is limited; first come, first seated. 

On Monday evenings only, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall.

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

Kīkā Kila: How the Hawaiian Steel Guitar Changed the Sound of Modern Music.  @ Lyman Museum
May 8 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Evening presentation:

Since the 19th century the distinctive tones of kīkā kila, the Hawaiian steel guitar, have defined the Island sound.  This program—and the recently published book of the same title—present the instrument’s definitive history, from its discovery by a young Hawaiian royalist named Joseph Kekuku to its revolutionary influence on American and world music.  During the 20th century Hawaiian musicians traveled the globe, from tent shows in the Mississippi Delta where they shaped the new sounds of country and the blues, to regal theaters and vaudeville stages in New York, Berlin, Kolkata, and beyond.  In the process, Hawaiian guitarists recast the role of the guitar in modern life.  But by the 1970s the instrument’s embrace and adoption overseas also challenged its cultural legitimacy in the eyes of a new generation of Hawaiian musicians—and the indigenous instrument nearly disappeared in its homeland.  Dr. John Troutman, Curator of American Music at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History (and himself a steel guitarist), uses rich musical and historical sources to share the comprehensive story of how this Native Hawaiian instrument transformed not only American music but the sounds of modern music throughout the world.  Indulge your enjoyment of this very special musical form at either the afternoon or the evening presentation of this not-to-be-missed program on May 8.  Copies of his unique book will be available in the Museum Shop, and Dr. Troutman will be happy to inscribe them.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers. 

Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge! 

Seating is limited; first come, first seated. 

On Monday evenings only, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall.

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

Jun
19
Mon
UPDATE: The Making of a Documentary: The Story of Katsu Goto.  @ Lyman Museum
Jun 19 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Evening presentation:

So many people contacted us to say how disappointed they were to have missed this popular program, first presented in March, that the filmmakers were asked if they could possibly repeat it for two more appreciative audiences.  Not only were they kind enough to agree, but they offered to include additional film footage as the documentary will be nearer to completion in June.  The remarkable story of Katsu Goto began in 1885 when, at the age of 23, he traveled to Hawai‘i to work as a laborer on a sugar plantation in Hāmākua.  Goto later became a local businessman and leader in the small Japanese community in Honoka‘a, where he opened a retail store and fought for the rights of his fellow community members working as plantation laborers.  But his business success and selfless service ultimately led to a tragic end:  on October 29, 1889, Goto was found hanging from a telephone pole, lynched in Honoka‘a town.  Today, 127 years later, his story is being given new life with the help of modern technology and the vision of filmmakers Patsy Iwasaki and Danny Miller.  Their presentation explores the research and making of “Honoka‘a Hero: The Story of Katsu Goto”—a powerful saga of hope and inspiration arising from tragedy, and the story too of his niece Dr. Fumiko Kaya, who established the Goto Foundation.  Drawn from academic and historical sources, the film also features historical reenactments in collaboration with students from UH-Hilo’s Performing Arts Department and its Chair, Dr. Jackie Pualani Johnson.  Learn more about this very moving chapter in Hawai‘i’s history on either of two occasions:  Monday evening, June 19, and a “matinée” on the following afternoon, Tuesday, June 20.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers. 

Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge! 

Seating is limited; first come, first seated. 

On Monday evenings only, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall.

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

Jun
20
Tue
UPDATE: The Making of a Documentary: The Story of Katsu Goto.  @ Lyman Museum
Jun 20 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm

Matinée presentation:

So many people contacted us to say how disappointed they were to have missed this popular program, first presented in March, that the filmmakers were asked if they could possibly repeat it for two more appreciative audiences.  Not only were they kind enough to agree, but they offered to include additional film footage as the documentary will be nearer to completion in June.  The remarkable story of Katsu Goto began in 1885 when, at the age of 23, he traveled to Hawai‘i to work as a laborer on a sugar plantation in Hāmākua.  Goto later became a local businessman and leader in the small Japanese community in Honoka‘a, where he opened a retail store and fought for the rights of his fellow community members working as plantation laborers.  But his business success and selfless service ultimately led to a tragic end:  on October 29, 1889, Goto was found hanging from a telephone pole, lynched in Honoka‘a town.  Today, 127 years later, his story is being given new life with the help of modern technology and the vision of filmmakers Patsy Iwasaki and Danny Miller.  Their presentation explores the research and making of “Honoka‘a Hero: The Story of Katsu Goto”—a powerful saga of hope and inspiration arising from tragedy, and the story too of his niece Dr. Fumiko Kaya, who established the Goto Foundation.  Drawn from academic and historical sources, the film also features historical reenactments in collaboration with students from UH-Hilo’s Performing Arts Department and its Chair, Dr. Jackie Pualani Johnson.  Learn more about this very moving chapter in Hawai‘i’s history on either of two occasions:  Monday evening, June 19, and a “matinée” on the following afternoon, Tuesday, June 20.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers. 

Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge! 

Seating is limited; first come, first seated. 

On Monday evenings only, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall.

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

Jun
26
Mon
Japanese Detainment on Hawai‘i Island During World War II.  @ Lyman Museum
Jun 26 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Evening presentation:

Many people are unaware that Kīlauea Military Camp in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park was used as a detainment camp for persons of Japanese ancestry during World War II—one of three locations on Hawai‘i Island where detainees are known to have been held.  Dr. Jadelyn Moniz Nakamura, integrated resources manager and archaeologist at HVNP, gives us an informative, poignant account of the arrest and subsequent detention of Japanese Issei (1st-generation immigrants) and Nisei (2nd-generation U.S. citizens) at KMC following the December 7, 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor, on two occasions:  Monday, June 26, and a “matinée” on the following afternoon, June 27.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers. 

Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge! 

Seating is limited; first come, first seated. 

On Monday evenings only, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall.

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

Jun
27
Tue
Japanese Detainment on Hawai‘i Island During World War II.  @ Lyman Museum
Jun 27 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm

Matinée presentation:

Many people are unaware that Kīlauea Military Camp in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park was used as a detainment camp for persons of Japanese ancestry during World War II—one of three locations on Hawai‘i Island where detainees are known to have been held.  Dr. Jadelyn Moniz Nakamura, integrated resources manager and archaeologist at HVNP, gives us an informative, poignant account of the arrest and subsequent detention of Japanese Issei (1st-generation immigrants) and Nisei (2nd-generation U.S. citizens) at KMC following the December 7, 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor, on two occasions:  Monday, June 26, and a “matinée” on the following afternoon, June 27.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers. 

Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge! 

Seating is limited; first come, first seated. 

On Monday evenings only, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall.

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

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