Events

Mar
6
Mon
The Making of a Documentary: The Story of Katsu Goto @ Lyman Museum
Mar 6 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm
Cast and Crew of Documentary: Katsu Goto, 2016

A few cast and crew pose for a photo on a production day at the Kona Historical Society’s Kona Coffee Living History Farm: (front) Kimo Apaka; (standing, l-r) Lawrence Mano, Patsy Iwasaki, Danny Miller (director), Mark Lewis (red shirt, camera crew), Tory Nakamura (UH Hilo student), Hoapili Mossman, Darrell Gabonia, and Baron Sekiya (camera crew). Photo by Bob Douglas.

Evening presentation:

The remarkable story of Katsu Goto has its roots beginning in 1885 when, at the age of 23, he traveled to Hawai‘i to work as a laborer on a sugar plantation in Hāmākua.  Contract completed, Goto became a local businessman and leader in the small Japanese community in the town of Honoka‘a, where he opened a retail store and fought for the rights of his fellow community members working as plantation laborers.  But his business success and selfless service ultimately led to a tragic end:  on October 29, 1889, Goto was found hanging from a telephone pole, lynched in Honoka‘a town.

Today, 127 years later, his story is being given new life with the help of modern technology and the vision of filmmakers Patsy Iwasaki and Danny Miller.  Their presentation explores the research and making of “Honoka‘a Hero: The Story of Katsu Goto”—a back-and-forth journey between Japan and Hawai‘i spanning more than 130 years—featuring Goto’s incredible true story, a powerful saga of hope and inspiration arising from tragedy, and the story too of his niece Dr. Fumiko Kaya, who established the Goto Foundation.  Drawn from academic and historical sources, the film also features historical reenactments in collaboration with students from UH-Hilo’s Performing Arts Department and its Chair, Dr. Jackie Pualani Johnson.  Joining Iwasaki and Miller is Dr. Yoshinori Kato, a researcher who shares some of his important contributions to the film.  Learn more about this very moving chapter in Hawai‘i’s history on either of two occasions:  Monday evening, March 6, and a “matinée” on the following afternoon, Tuesday, March 7.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers. 

Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge! 

Seating is limited; first come, first seated. 

On Monday evenings only, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall.

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

Mar
7
Tue
The Making of a Documentary: The Story of Katsu Goto @ Lyman Museum
Mar 7 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm
Cast and Crew of Documentary: Katsu Goto, 2016

A few cast and crew pose for a photo on a production day at the Kona Historical Society’s Kona Coffee Living History Farm: (front) Kimo Apaka; (standing, l-r) Lawrence Mano, Patsy Iwasaki, Danny Miller (director), Mark Lewis (red shirt, camera crew), Tory Nakamura (UH Hilo student), Hoapili Mossman, Darrell Gabonia, and Baron Sekiya (camera crew). Photo by Bob Douglas.

Matinée presentation:

The remarkable story of Katsu Goto has its roots beginning in 1885 when, at the age of 23, he traveled to Hawai‘i to work as a laborer on a sugar plantation in Hāmākua.  Contract completed, Goto became a local businessman and leader in the small Japanese community in the town of Honoka‘a, where he opened a retail store and fought for the rights of his fellow community members working as plantation laborers.  But his business success and selfless service ultimately led to a tragic end:  on October 29, 1889, Goto was found hanging from a telephone pole, lynched in Honoka‘a town.

Today, 127 years later, his story is being given new life with the help of modern technology and the vision of filmmakers Patsy Iwasaki and Danny Miller.  Their presentation explores the research and making of “Honoka‘a Hero: The Story of Katsu Goto”—a back-and-forth journey between Japan and Hawai‘i spanning more than 130 years—featuring Goto’s incredible true story, a powerful saga of hope and inspiration arising from tragedy, and the story too of his niece Dr. Fumiko Kaya, who established the Goto Foundation.  Drawn from academic and historical sources, the film also features historical reenactments in collaboration with students from UH-Hilo’s Performing Arts Department and its Chair, Dr. Jackie Pualani Johnson.  Joining Iwasaki and Miller is Dr. Yoshinori Kato, a researcher who shares some of his important contributions to the film.  Learn more about this very moving chapter in Hawai‘i’s history on either of two occasions:  Monday evening, March 6, and a “matinée” on the following afternoon, Tuesday, March 7.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers. 

Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge! 

Seating is limited; first come, first seated. 

On Monday evenings only, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall.

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

Mar
25
Sat
Just Published!: The Hawaiian Horse @ Lyman Museum
Mar 25 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm

book_coverLast June we were treated to a sneak preview of The Hawaiian Horse, the latest in the remarkable series of Bergin volumes detailing an era in Hawai‘i’s history.  Our whistles having been collectively wet, authors and veterinarians Dr. Billy Bergin and son Dr. Brady Bergin return this afternoon with a more detailed account of their just-published book.  It’s a definitive history of the role of the horse in Hawai‘i from its arrival in 1803 through the social, agricultural, military, and sports fields over a span of two centuries.  Celebrated are the men and women who have contributed to the horse’s importance in the era of royalty, sugar and pineapple times, two world wars, and the arenas of pā‘ū, polo, racing, rodeo, dressage, and pleasure riding.  Current issues such as overpopulation, humane care, and equine health are handled in sensitive but realistic terms as they apply to local as well as national venues.

Join us this afternoon as these knowledgeable vets and compelling storytellers describe the horse’s place in Hawai‘i’s future in prophetic, practical, and cautiously optimistic terms.  Copies of this beautiful book will be available in the Museum Shop, and Drs. B and B will be happy to inscribe them.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers. 

Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge! 

Seating is limited; first come, first seated. 

On Monday evenings only, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall.

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

Mar
27
Mon
Living with Earthquakes on Hawaiian Volcanoes @ Lyman Museum
Mar 27 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm
Kamoamoa Fissure_small

Kamoamoa fissure: The 4-day Kamoamoa fissure eruption in March 2011 fountained spatter as high as 30 meters (100feet) into the air.

Evening presentation:

Thousands of earthquakes occur in Hawai‘i each year; most are related to volcanic activity, but some are not.  What’s the difference?  In this presentation, Brian Shiro of the USGS Hawaiian Volcanic Observatory describes the different types of earthquake experienced in Hawai‘i, how seismologists monitor them, and how seismic data are used as a primary tool to forecast volcanic eruptions.  Want to know more about our historic damaging earthquakes, seismic hazards in our State, and how we can prepare for the next Big One?  Brian addresses these topics and more, including the new, low-cost technology allowing citizen scientists to record earthquake shaking and to participate in the process of earthquake monitoring!  Expand your knowledge at either the afternoon or the evening presentation of this fascinating program on Monday, March 27.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers. 

Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge! 

Seating is limited; first come, first seated. 

On Monday evenings only, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall.

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

Living with Earthquakes on Hawaiian Volcanoes @ Lyman Museum
Mar 27 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm
Kamoamoa Fissure_small

Kamoamoa fissure: The 4-day Kamoamoa fissure eruption in March 2011 fountained spatter as high as 30 meters (100feet) into the air.

Matinée presentation:

Thousands of earthquakes occur in Hawai‘i each year; most are related to volcanic activity, but some are not.  What’s the difference?  In this presentation, Brian Shiro of the USGS Hawaiian Volcanic Observatory describes the different types of earthquake experienced in Hawai‘i, how seismologists monitor them, and how seismic data are used as a primary tool to forecast volcanic eruptions.  Want to know more about our historic damaging earthquakes, seismic hazards in our State, and how we can prepare for the next Big One?  Brian addresses these topics and more, including the new, low-cost technology allowing citizen scientists to record earthquake shaking and to participate in the process of earthquake monitoring!  Expand your knowledge at either the afternoon or the evening presentation of this fascinating program on Monday, March 27.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers. 

Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge! 

Seating is limited; first come, first seated. 

On Monday evenings only, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall.

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

Apr
14
Fri
Ni‘ihau Shell workshop with Kele Kanahele @ Lyman Museum
Apr 14 @ 10:00 am – 4:00 pm
Ni‘ihau jewelry in the heliconia poleho style

Ni‘ihau jewelry in the heliconia poleho style

Just in time for Merrie Monarch, Kele Kanahele of the Island of Ni‘ihau returns to teach the authentic creation of Ni‘ihau shell jewelry at the Lyman Museum!  Visit his acclaimed workshop twice in April:

Friday, April 14                                       10:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M.
Saturday, April 15                                  10:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M.

On either day you will learn how to make a 22-inch necklace/lei or a pair of earrings in the heliconia poleho style, using either black poleho or the more rare honey-gold poleho shells—both augmented with momi ke‘oke‘o or momi lenalena shells.  Prices vary according to Museum membership and choice of shells, but are exceptionally reasonable!  You may, of course, create more than one piece, as long as you sign up for specific pieces in advance.  Space is limited to 24 persons per day; only people who have registered can be permitted in the classroom.  Reservations must be made, pieces and shell colors specified, and the workshop fee(s) paid by Friday, April 7, to ensure your place and the availability of shells.

Learn to create these treasures of Ni‘ihau from a master—and give a uniquely Hawaiian gift (to yourself, perhaps?)!  For pricing and other information, please call 935-5021 ext. 101 or stop by the Museum’s Admissions desk.

Apr
15
Sat
Ni‘ihau Shell workshop with Kele Kanahele @ Lyman Museum
Apr 15 @ 10:00 am – 4:00 pm
Ni‘ihau jewelry in the heliconia poleho style

Ni‘ihau jewelry in the heliconia poleho style

Just in time for Merrie Monarch, Kele Kanahele of the Island of Ni‘ihau returns to teach the authentic creation of Ni‘ihau shell jewelry at the Lyman Museum!  Visit his acclaimed workshop twice in April:

Friday, April 14                                       10:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M.
Saturday, April 15                                  10:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M.

On either day you will learn how to make a 22-inch necklace/lei or a pair of earrings in the heliconia poleho style, using either black poleho or the more rare honey-gold poleho shells—both augmented with momi ke‘oke‘o or momi lenalena shells.  Prices vary according to Museum membership and choice of shells, but are exceptionally reasonable!  You may, of course, create more than one piece, as long as you sign up for specific pieces in advance.  Space is limited to 24 persons per day; only people who have registered can be permitted in the classroom.  Reservations must be made, pieces and shell colors specified, and the workshop fee(s) paid by Friday, April 7, to ensure your place and the availability of shells.

Learn to create these treasures of Ni‘ihau from a master—and give a uniquely Hawaiian gift (to yourself, perhaps?)!  For pricing and other information, please call 935-5021 ext. 101 or stop by the Museum’s Admissions desk.

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