Events

May
27
Mon
Lyman Museum Participating in Blue Star Museums 2019 @ Lyman Museum
May 27 @ 10:00 am – Sep 2 @ 4:30 pm

 BSM-2019-Color-Logo-thumb

This summer the Lyman Museum is again participating in Blue Star Museums, a collaboration among the National Endowment for the Arts, Blue Star Families, the Department of Defense, and more than 2,000 museums across America, to offer free admission to active duty military personnel (including the National Guard and Reserve) and their families, from Armed Forces Day through Labor Day 2019.  Please note that the Museum is closed on Memorial Day (May 27, 2019), Independence Day (July 4, 2019) and Labor Day (September 2, 2019).

 The free admission program is available to any bearer of a Geneva Convention Common Access Card (CAC), a DD Form 1173 id card (dependent id), or a DD Form 1173-1 id card, which includes active-duty U.S. military—Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, Coast Guard, as well as members of the National Guard and Reserve, U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps, NOAA Commissioned Corps—and up to five family members.

For more information, go to: https://www.arts.gov/national/blue-star-museums/frequently-asked-questions, or call the Museum at (808) 935-5021.  The Lyman Museum is a Smithsonian Affiliate, located at 276 Haili Street in historic downtown Hilo, and is open Monday—Saturday, 10:00 a.m. through 4:30 p.m. except on Federal holidays.

 

Jul
22
Mon
‘Ili‘ahi: The Story of Sandalwood in Hawai‘i @ Lyman Museum
Jul 22 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm
A Hawai‘i ‘Amakihi forages for nectar in the blossoms of the Haleakalā Sandalwood, Santalum haleakalae.  Photo credit:  Hayataro Sakitsu

A Hawai‘i ‘Amakihi forages for nectar in the blossoms of the Haleakalā Sandalwood, Santalum haleakalae. Photo credit: Hayataro Sakitsu

Evening Presentation:

Did you know: The largest forests of sandalwood on the planet once grew in the Hawaiian Islands?  In what’s been called one of the darkest chapters in Hawai‘i’s history, the infamous sandalwood trade of the early 1800s rendered this valuable commodity “commercially extinct,” and left the people and landscapes of our islands forever changed.  Hawai‘i’s first-ever commercial product, sandalwood was the lifeblood of the Kingdom in a time of cataclysmic change.  Trade in this precious wood plunged the monarchy into debt and the people into virtual slavery, against a backdrop of death and disease, cultural and environmental collapse.  As the lessons of history fade over time, increasing global demand today means that Hawaiian sandalwood—and sandalwood worldwide—face renewed threats.  Local biologist John Stallman explores the past, present, and future of sandalwood in Hawai‘i with a discussion of the ecology, cultural significance, and conservation of this priceless resource, on two occasions:  Monday evening, July 22, and the following afternoon, July 23.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers.  Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge!  Seating is limited; first come, first seated.  ON MONDAY EVENINGS ONLY, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

Jul
23
Tue
‘Ili‘ahi: The Story of Sandalwood in Hawai‘i @ Lyman Museum
Jul 23 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm
A Hawai‘i ‘Amakihi forages for nectar in the blossoms of the Haleakalā Sandalwood, Santalum haleakalae.  Photo credit:  Hayataro Sakitsu

A Hawai‘i ‘Amakihi forages for nectar in the blossoms of the Haleakalā Sandalwood, Santalum haleakalae. Photo credit: Hayataro Sakitsu

Matinée Presentation:

Did you know: The largest forests of sandalwood on the planet once grew in the Hawaiian Islands?  In what’s been called one of the darkest chapters in Hawai‘i’s history, the infamous sandalwood trade of the early 1800s rendered this valuable commodity “commercially extinct,” and left the people and landscapes of our islands forever changed.  Hawai‘i’s first-ever commercial product, sandalwood was the lifeblood of the Kingdom in a time of cataclysmic change.  Trade in this precious wood plunged the monarchy into debt and the people into virtual slavery, against a backdrop of death and disease, cultural and environmental collapse.  As the lessons of history fade over time, increasing global demand today means that Hawaiian sandalwood—and sandalwood worldwide—face renewed threats.  Local biologist John Stallman explores the past, present, and future of sandalwood in Hawai‘i with a discussion of the ecology, cultural significance, and conservation of this priceless resource, on two occasions:  Monday evening, July 22, and the following afternoon, July 23.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers.  Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge!  Seating is limited; first come, first seated.  ON MONDAY EVENINGS ONLY, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

Jul
29
Mon
Roosevelt’s “Tree Army” Takes Root in Hawai‘i: The Story of the Civilian Conservation Corps and Hawai‘i National Park @ Lyman Museum
Jul 29 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Evening Presentation:

In the early years of our nation’s Great Depression, presidential candidate Franklin D. Roosevelt promised a “new deal” to help put Americans back to work.  In 1933, President Roosevelt initiated a series of programs to spur relief, recovery, and reform of the national economy.  One of the first programs established was the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC), which focused on engaging unemployed young men in agricultural and conservation projects.  Known as the “Tree Army,” the CCC provided young men with jobs on public lands across the country.  The National Park Service was charged with developing such projects, which ranged from fire prevention to erosion and insect control, trash cleanup, reforestation, landscape maintenance, and construction.  The CCC reached the Hawaiian Islands in January 1934 with the establishment of two camps in Hawai‘i National Park, the main one at the Kīlauea Section and a smaller one at Haleakalā.  In exchange for their participation, enrollees were housed, fed, clothed, given medical care, and paid $30.00 per month.  Over a period of seven years the CCC built or reinforced much of the park’s infrastructure.  In 1941 and 1942 these efforts were especially important, as many of the emergency war projects needed by the military were completed.  The legacy of the CCC lives on, since many of the facilities built by these men are still used by park visitors and staff today!  Join Dr. Jadelyn Moniz Nakamura, HVNP Integrated Resources Manager and Science Advisor, to learn more about this fascinating piece of local and national history, on two occasions:  Monday evening, July 29, and the following afternoon, July 30.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers.  Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge!  Seating is limited; first come, first seated.  ON MONDAY EVENINGS ONLY, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

 

Jul
30
Tue
Roosevelt’s “Tree Army” Takes Root in Hawai‘i: The Story of the Civilian Conservation Corps and Hawai‘i National Park @ Lyman Museum
Jul 30 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm

Matinée Presentation:

In the early years of our nation’s Great Depression, presidential candidate Franklin D. Roosevelt promised a “new deal” to help put Americans back to work.  In 1933, President Roosevelt initiated a series of programs to spur relief, recovery, and reform of the national economy.  One of the first programs established was the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC), which focused on engaging unemployed young men in agricultural and conservation projects.  Known as the “Tree Army,” the CCC provided young men with jobs on public lands across the country.  The National Park Service was charged with developing such projects, which ranged from fire prevention to erosion and insect control, trash cleanup, reforestation, landscape maintenance, and construction.  The CCC reached the Hawaiian Islands in January 1934 with the establishment of two camps in Hawai‘i National Park, the main one at the Kīlauea Section and a smaller one at Haleakalā.  In exchange for their participation, enrollees were housed, fed, clothed, given medical care, and paid $30.00 per month.  Over a period of seven years the CCC built or reinforced much of the park’s infrastructure.  In 1941 and 1942 these efforts were especially important, as many of the emergency war projects needed by the military were completed.  The legacy of the CCC lives on, since many of the facilities built by these men are still used by park visitors and staff today!  Join Dr. Jadelyn Moniz Nakamura, HVNP Integrated Resources Manager and Science Advisor, to learn more about this fascinating piece of local and national history, on two occasions:  Monday evening, July 29, and the following afternoon, July 30.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers.  Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge!  Seating is limited; first come, first seated.  ON MONDAY EVENINGS ONLY, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

 

Aug
19
Mon
Coconut: The Incredible Journey @ Lyman Museum
Aug 19 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Coconut palm grove_smallEvening Presentation:

The islands of Hawai‘i emerged from the ocean near the center of one of the most mysterious regions of the globe.  Obscured by time and the endless open sea, the origins and migrations of the peoples of the Pacific were long lost or incompletely understood—until recently.  While archaeology, linguistics, and other fields have tackled such questions with often piecemeal results, some definitive answers have lately been found in the biology of the tropics.  Modern genetic studies—of coconuts—are shedding new light on humanity’s epic ocean voyages.  Among a handful of plants whose modern distribution closely mirrors ancient human migrations, the humble coconut has been key to some of humankind’s greatest accomplishments … and some of the greatest discoveries in modern science!  Local biologist John Stallman traces the path of the coconut across the illusive map of our history, on two occasions:  Monday evening, August 19, and the following afternoon, August 20.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers.  Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge!  Seating is limited; first come, first seated.  ON MONDAY EVENINGS ONLY, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

 

Aug
20
Tue
Coconut: The Incredible Journey @ Lyman Museum
Aug 20 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Coconut palm grove_smallMatinée Presentation:

The islands of Hawai‘i emerged from the ocean near the center of one of the most mysterious regions of the globe.  Obscured by time and the endless open sea, the origins and migrations of the peoples of the Pacific were long lost or incompletely understood—until recently.  While archaeology, linguistics, and other fields have tackled such questions with often piecemeal results, some definitive answers have lately been found in the biology of the tropics.  Modern genetic studies—of coconuts—are shedding new light on humanity’s epic ocean voyages.  Among a handful of plants whose modern distribution closely mirrors ancient human migrations, the humble coconut has been key to some of humankind’s greatest accomplishments … and some of the greatest discoveries in modern science!  Local biologist John Stallman traces the path of the coconut across the illusive map of our history, on two occasions:  Monday evening, August 19, and the following afternoon, August 20.

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers.  Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge!  Seating is limited; first come, first seated.  ON MONDAY EVENINGS ONLY, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

 

Aug
26
Mon
Post-Fire Recovery and Restoration at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park @ Lyman Museum
Aug 26 @ 3:00 pm – 8:30 pm

fire (002)_smallMatinée and Evening presentation (ONE DATE ONLY):

In the midst of the Kīlauea eruption crisis of 2018, an unrelated wildfire ignited near Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park on August 5, burning nearly 4,000 acres—much of this area within the park itself.  More than 100 people from various organizations worked together to suppress the Keauhou Fire, which scorched protective fences and consumed thousands of acres of koa forest and native shrubland.  Destructive as that was, the Keauhou Fire also provided an opportunity to restore biodiversity, control invasive plants, and build fire resilience by boosting populations of fire-tolerant native species which today are quickly reclaiming the charred landscape off Mauna Loa Road.  In today’s warmer, drier world, wildfires are expected (and are proving) to be more frequent.  HVNP botanist Sierra McDaniel shares these experiences and their consequences, and illustrates the value of preparing for wildfire events, twice on Monday, August 26 (afternoon and evening).

Admission to these wonderful programs is free to Museum members, and $3.00 for nonmembers.  Please support the Museum by becoming a member, and enjoy all Saigo Series programs, all year round, at no charge!  Seating is limited; first come, first seated.  ON MONDAY EVENINGS ONLY, additional parking is available next door at Hilo Union School, Kapiolani St. entrance; park, then walk through our green gate in the rock wall

On Monday evenings, doors open at 6:30PM.  E komo mai!

 

Aug
30
Fri
Ni`ihau Shell Jewelry Workshops @ Lyman Museum and Mission House
Aug 30 @ 10:00 am – 4:00 pm
Ni‘ihau jewelry in the combined helikonia and pikake styles.

Ni‘ihau jewelry in the combined helikonia and pikake styles.

By popular demand, Kele Kanahele of the Island of Ni`ihau returns to teach the authentic creation of Ni`ihau shell jewelry at the Lyman Museum!  Visit his acclaimed workshop twice in August:

Friday, August 30                             10:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M.
Saturday, August 31                         10:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M.

On either day you may learn how to make a 22-inch necklace/lei ($370 for Museum members, $380 nonmembers) or pair of earrings ($85 members, $95 nonmembers) each piece combining both the helikonia and pikake styles, using your choice of off-white or yellow momi shells AND your choice of pink, red, or green kahelelani shells.   Choose your color when making your reservation!  You may, of course, create more than one piece, as long as you sign up for specific pieces in advance.  Space is limited to 24 persons per day; only people who have registered can be permitted in the classroom.  Reservations must be made, pieces and colors specified, and the workshop fee(s) paid by Saturday, August 24, to ensure your place and the availability of shells.

Learn to create these treasures of Ni`ihau from a Master!  For more information, please call 935-5021 ext. 101 or stop by the Museum’s Admissions desk.

 

Aug
31
Sat
Ni`ihau Shell Jewelry Workshops @ Lyman Museum and Mission House
Aug 31 @ 10:00 am – 4:00 pm
Ni‘ihau jewelry in the combined helikonia and pikake styles.

Ni‘ihau jewelry in the combined helikonia and pikake styles.

By popular demand, Kele Kanahele of the Island of Ni`ihau returns to teach the authentic creation of Ni`ihau shell jewelry at the Lyman Museum!  Visit his acclaimed workshop twice in August:

Friday, August 30                             10:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M.
Saturday, August 31                         10:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M.

On either day you may learn how to make a 22-inch necklace/lei ($370 for Museum members, $380 nonmembers) or pair of earrings ($85 members, $95 nonmembers) each piece combining both the helikonia and pikake styles, using your choice of off-white or yellow momi shells AND your choice of pink, red, or green kahelelani shells.   Choose your color when making your reservation!  You may, of course, create more than one piece, as long as you sign up for specific pieces in advance.  Space is limited to 24 persons per day; only people who have registered can be permitted in the classroom.  Reservations must be made, pieces and colors specified, and the workshop fee(s) paid by Saturday, August 24, to ensure your place and the availability of shells.

Learn to create these treasures of Ni`ihau from a Master!  For more information, please call 935-5021 ext. 101 or stop by the Museum’s Admissions desk.

 

Oct
26
Sat
Eleventh Annual Golf Tournament Fundraiser @ Kohanaiki Golf Course
Oct 26 @ 7:00 am – 3:00 pm

The Lyman Museum and Mission House will be holding its Fred Koehnen Memorial Golf Tournament on Saturday, October 26, 2019 at the Hualālai Golf Course at Ka’upulehu.  This tournament is a two-person scramble limited to 72 players. Registration is at 7:00 am, Shotgun start at 8:00 am, 1:00 pm Lunch, Refreshments and Awards served at the Hualālai Grill. (Please download registration form)

The Lyman Museum was established by the descendants of missionaries David and Sarah Lyman in 1931. The Lyman Museum is home to a superb collection of natural and cultural artifacts, fine art, and natural history exhibits. The archives houses thousands of historical documents, books, maps and photographic collections.

Regardless of age or heritage, the Lyman Museum is here for all who seek to learn about Hawai’i, its islands and its people. Some 2,000 students toured the Museum this past year! 

The Lyman Museum is one of only four Hawai’i museums accredited by the American Association of Museums and is also a Smithsonian Affiliate.  The Lyman Museum holds 501(c)(3) tax exempt status and your donation is tax deductible. This fundraiser will support the Lyman Museum’s efforts to preserve the past and collect the present for the future.

We sincerely appreciate your support.  We want to be sure you and your company are recognized, and we look forward to hearing from you by October 11, 2019. Early Bird registration deadline is September 30, 2019 (Early Bird players will be entered to win extra prizes)

For more information, please feel free to contact Liz Ambrose at (808) 935-5021 extension 106.

To download a golf flyer for the event click here!

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